Scientific Sessions

All meeting attendees will be expected to give a presentation or show a poster in one of the following sessions:

  • Chemistry and Ecotoxicology of Lakes, Rivers, and Streams

For this session, presentations should focus on chemistry and ecotoxicology of freshwater lakes, rivers, and streams. A variety of topics will be presented in this session, including the effects of contaminants of emerging concern and other abiotic stressors on freshwater ecosystems. Topics such as comparison of sublethal responses to contaminants in freshwater, exposure routes and ecological effects of chemicals on freshwater organisms, laboratory-based toxicity studies, fate and transport of chemicals in freshwater environments, and large-scale environmental events such as algal blooms are welcome.

  • Marine Ecotoxicology and Chemistry

For this session, presentations should focus on chemistry and ecotoxicology of marine ecosystems. A variety of topics will be presented in this session, including effects of contaminants of emerging concern and other abiotic stressors on estuarine and marine organisms. Topics such as comparison of sublethal responses to contaminants in marine and estuarine ecosystems, exposure and ecological effects of chemicals on marine and estuarine organisms, laboratory-based toxicity studies, fate and transport of chemicals in marine or estuarine environments, and large-scale environmental events such as marine or estuarine algal blooms or water acidification are welcome.

  • Terrestrial Ecotoxicology and Chemistry

Terrestrial ecotoxicology focuses on the effects of chemicals and other abiotic stressors on terrestrial organisms. This session will focus on the unique considerations of exposure and toxicological studies required for organisms in terrestrial environments. This session will highlight ecologically relevant field and laboratory studies, as well as modeling approaches that aim to improve our understanding of direct and indirect impacts of chemical exposure on terrestrial wildlife. Examples of acceptable topics include: exposure and ecological effects of chemicals in terrestrial biota and soil, fate and transport of chemicals in terrestrial environments, soil toxicity, and impacts/assessments of agricultural chemicals.

  • Method Development for Environmental Analytical Chemistry

Acquiring and interpreting high-quality chemical data is crucial to enhancing our understanding of environmental pollution. This session will highlight the use of analytical tools for accurate and precise characterization of environmental contaminants. Example topics in this session include: chemical analysis and monitoring of pollutants in air, water, sediment, and biota, development of new analytical methods, and improvement of existing methods for analysis of pollutants in all environmental compartments.

  • Molecular Toxicology and –Omics Approaches

Molecular toxicology focuses on the effects of contaminants on organisms at the subcellular level, observing changes in gene or protein expression, protein function, metabolism, signaling pathways, and other molecular endpoints. In this session we encourage abstracts from a range of topics including the individual interactions of chemicals with molecular components (DNA damage, biotransformation, pathway disruption, epigenetic changes) and population level effects of contaminants (changes in genetic variability, mutation rate, transgenerational and evolutionary responses).This session will also spotlight ‘omics approaches (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, lipidomics and metabolomics), as they can provide molecular insights into the biological significance of chemical exposure. Example topics include: ‘omics-based predictions of apical endpoints, cross-species extrapolations, studies integrating chemical monitoring and ‘omics, biomonitoring, biomarker development, chemical risk assessments and non-invasive ‘omics applications. Abstracts focused on molecular toxicology or ‘omics technologies related to molecular study are welcome.

  • Nanomaterials in the Environment

Over the last decade, the field of nanotechnology has grown exponentially due to the numerous commercial, industrial, technological, and biological applications of nanomaterials (NMs). An increase in NM production has led to a rise in their environmental release, making these chemicals an emerging contaminant of concern. The potential fate and interactions NMs with environmental components, along with the effects of these compounds on biota, remains relatively unknown. This session aims to address the fate, interactions, and biological impacts of environmentally released NMs. Example topics include: toxicological effects of NMs, release, fate, and movement of NMs in the environment, NM risk assessment, and NM characterization and synthesis.

  • Environmental Modeling and Risk Assessment

A number of approaches in environmental modeling have been recently developed to understand risk associated with contamination in air, soils/sediments, and water. The application of these advances in science and modeling in aquatic and terrestrial environments are contributing to improved environmental policy, pollution prevention, ecosystem management goals, discharge objectives, remediation goals and criteria development in regulatory programs. This session will review advances in science related to environmental stressors in the context of risk assessment and modeling. Abstracts involving environmental modeling (empirical, conceptual, and process-based) and risk assessment (development and use of adverse outcome pathways (AOPs), site-specific case studies, novel testing strategies for risk assessment, and issues in environmental management) are encouraged to apply.

  • Public Health and Epidemiology

Public health focuses on the promotion of health through the adoption of preventative and interventive health strategies at the individual, community, and population levels. Environmental health, a branch of public health, focuses on factors in the natural and built environment that might affect human health, and is a growing field in light of shifts in global climate, population, industrialization, and social and cultural norms. One aspect of environmental health is assessing the incidence and distribution of environmental stressors using epidemiological tools, which can provide valuable insight regarding the relationship between human health and the surrounding environment. This session will highlight public health concerns related to contaminant exposure, environmental degradation, urbanization, impacts of climate change, human health and epidemiological studies in relation to environmental contaminants, global transport processes, and public perception of environmental risks.